The Best of Times, the Worst of Times

During the late teens and early 20’s of the last century, the War to end all wars (a misnomer if there ever was one) had ended, and the Spanish Flu (that originated in Kansas) had run its devastating course. Perhaps no period in American history saw such abrupt changes to society as the period of the …

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On Inference, Causation, Correlation, and Association: How Scientists Assign Outcomes of Research, and why it is Important.

Thanks to my friend and associate Michael Lo for his input on this. Recently, the media seems intent on furthering the scientific ignorance that seems to be rampant in American culture. From Alternative facts to inconvenient truths, science is taking a beating at the hands of pseudoscientists, politicians, and others who have no business making …

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How Targeted Drugs Fight Disease, and why Funding Research is Critical

Recently our family has been once again forced to deal with a diagnosis of cancer. I have avoided writing on this subject in the past but have decided to write a brief article on the advances in cancer treatments. I enlisted the help of my good friend and research molecular biologist, Vera Chang from Oregon …

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Climate Disruption and Changes in Infectious Disease Patterns: The Worst is Yet to Come.

  Most scientists will tell you that evolution does not favor the fastest, the strongest, or even the cleverest. Evolution favors the most adaptable. Humans, as a species (race is an antiquated and dishonest ideology), are highly adaptable, having populated, at least to some degree, every continent on planet earth regardless of how inhospitable. While …

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The Willow, the Tortoise, and The Master: The Use of Symbolism in Positive Psychology, Mindfulness, and Self-Help

As Desdemona is preparing for bed on the night she will be murdered, she sings a song about a willow tree. In Hamlet we learn that the prince’s love, Ophelia, falls from a willow tree into a brook where she drowns. Shakespeare may have understood the willow as a symbol of loss and grief, and …

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Autism: Can Computational Biology and Environmental Health Finally Provide Answers?

The Increasing Rate of Autism in America When I first studied psychology as an undergraduate student, the rate of autism in the United States was one in 10,000. Today it is about one in 55. And while some suspected that the rise in autism was due to changes in diagnostic standards, new findings point to …

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Water

"Cross the meadow and the stream and listen as the peaceful water brings peace upon your soul." ~ Maximillian Degenerez Recently I decided to get a new scale for the bathroom, and being easily impressed by technology, I selected one with several assessments aside from weight. This included measures for muscle weight, bone weight, BMI, …

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